Moles

Moles

What do they look like?

These are small mammals spending most of their lives underground. Consuming 70% to 100% of their body weight they eat worms, insects and grubs. Three species are in NY State: Eastern Mole, the Hairy-tailed Mole and Star-nosed Mole. The dark grey colored Eastern Mole, 7 inches total, is the most common mole found in our yards. They lack external ears, have small eyes, small hind feet, large forefeet and long palms with claws that they use for digging. Short 1 ¼" tail, hairless snout that extends ½" in front of the mouth opening.

Are they Dangerous?

No health hazard is posed to the public except from the ticks and mites they carry. They will bite to defend themselves.

Signs:

Signs:

Look for mounds of sand and tunnels. Moles burrow where food is located. Mounds are the result of tunnel excavation 6 inches or deeper in the soil and remain active in Winter. Healthy moist lawns and grassy areas are often Mole targets. Most activity is during periods of rain in the late spring and early summer when finding food. The home range of a male Eastern Mole is a massive 2.7 acres. 3 to 5 moles are considered fair density per acre.

Change the composition of the soil to a mixture of heavy clay and rocks to create a habitat inhospitable to Moles. Most clients will not tolerate this technique as the types of plants will be limited that could be sustained there including the lovely lawn they have taken care of so nicely.

Rather let Critterex sign you up for a maintenance contract (Moles do Not hibernate) or a once off "Blitz" to reduce population to a manageable level. We use CO natural gas fumes blown into their burrows to gently and humanely allow the Moles to "rest in peace", best way to go and no need for a burial.